No matter the profession you are in, there may come a time where you feel as if change is the order of the day. In the event that happens, do you have a plan in place to make a job switch?

For many individuals, switching jobs can prove rather mundane. Others, yet, find it to be a rather arduous process. If you find yourself in the latter group, how can you go about making things a little bit easier?

 

Often, taking the time to think things through is where you need to start.

 

For instance, a few of the gaffes to avoid in your job search:

 

· Almost never resign from your current job until you have another one lined up for certain. That said there may be some occasions where leaving is your only choice.

· Avoid letting co-workers know you are searching (see more below).

 

· Don’t rely on a resume that is several years old. Be sure to update it with your most recent position and skillset.

With that in mind, has the time come to switch jobs?

 

Know What Your Options Are

 

If you feel that now is the right time to switch jobs, do you have a beat on the current job market info?

 

To start, it is imperative that you know what you may be getting yourself into. Among the questions to ask:

 

· Are there a lot of openings in my particular field at the moment?

 

· Will I be making more money if I switch jobs or the same amount? Always weigh the pros and cons of a switch if the money is about equal to now or even less than what you currently make.

· If I take a new job, will I have to move, in some instances far from where I have family and friends at the present time?

 

Even though job markets can change, knowing what they are at the present time does help.

 

Keep the Job Search to Yourself

 

One big mistake that many individuals end up making is spilling the beans about their job search. In turn, one’s boss can get wind of it. If that happens, it is safe to say that life can become a little bit uncomfortable around the office.

Even if you are best friends with a co-worker or two, do not tell them about your pending job search. Often, they would act the same way. Wait until you have another position locked up.

 

Given how many prospective jobs can drop at the last minute, try to get some form of guarantee from a new employer. The best is a contract, though many companies do not offer such opportunities.

 

In some cases, you are best-served by trying out a position elsewhere on a part-time basis.

 

As an example, more companies are allowing employees to work in a remote setting these days.

 

See if you can do some freelance work for a potential new employer while retaining your current job. This will give you a better idea about whether to make the leap full-time if offered.

To help others, what have your experiences been when you thought about switching jobs?